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What is the Impact of PP funding?

What was the impact of the expenditure for 2019-20?

 

  • The schools approach to PP has positively impacted on both the softer data & importantly some of the hard data collected internally.

 

Social and Emotional Wellbeing:

  • 20 PP children accessing nurture provision in autumn and spring (across 24 different children)
  • The Rainbow Den nurture provision significantly impacted positively on mental health and well- being of those attending sessions – evidence in Boxhall Profiles and unofficial pupil, parent and staff voice.
  • In-class learning daily around positive mental health and mindfulness – now part of in class daily timetable.
  • Since school closure children accessing the Zumos platform and other mental health resources shared by school. Continuing to develop quality and consistency of mental health and well-being provision use across school.
  • In-school counselling referrals made where needed.
  • 10 PP children accessed counselling and evaluated as successful outcomes.
  • 24 PP children benefitted from accessing small group weekly yoga sessions across the year.
  • 2 children attended an external after school club free of charge.

 

Academic Data:

  • Across school increased % of PP children achieving the expected standards in reading, writing & maths (PP cohort as a whole).
  • 8% of PP children have made better than expected progress
  • 85% of PP children have maintained previous benchmarks (data negatively impacted by school closures)
  • There is a varied picture with PP and Non PP children across school.
  • In 4 year groups, there was a clear diminishing of the gap between PP and Non PP at EXS levels. (Up until school closures).

 

Reading

  • Improving data term on term when whole PP cohort compared to previous year and previous term’s data (until school closures).
  • Increased % of PP children achieving the expected standards at end of KS1 in Reading (2019 - 30% to 2020 - 57%)
  • Decreased % of PP children achieving the expected standards at end of KS2 in Reading (2019 - 57% to 2020 - 40%)
  • Using internal data only from spring term only as no SATS or summer term assessment
  • High level of SEND in Y6 cohort and significant change in PP cohort impacted negatively on data.

 

Writing

  • Improving data term on term when whole PP cohort compared to previous year and previous term’s data (until school closures).
  • Increased % of PP children achieving the expected standard at the end of KS1 in writing. (W: 2019 - 50% - 2020 - 57%)
  • Decreased % of PP children achieving the expected standard at the end of KS2 in writing. (W: 2019 - 71% - 2020 - 40%)
  • Using internal data only from spring term only as no SATS or summer term assessment
  • 6 children made more then expected progress (not evident in overall data as 6 other children have not maintained attainment) 5 of the 6 children who have not made expected progress are pupils that are new to school.
  • High level of SEND in Y6 cohort and significant change in PP cohort impacted negatively on data.

 

Maths

  • Improving data term on term when whole PP cohort compared to previous year and previous term’s data (until school closures).
  • Increased % of PP children achieving the expected standard at the end of KS1 in maths. (M: 2019 - 40% - 2020 - 43%)
  • Decreased % of PP children achieving the expected standard at the end of KS2 in writing. (M: 2019 - 43% - 2020 - 33%)
  • Using internal data only from spring term only as no SATS or summer term assessment
  • 7 children made more than expected progress (not evident in overall data as 10 other children have not maintained attainment) 5 of the 10 children who have not made expected progress so far are pupils that are new to school.
  • High level of SEND in Y6 cohort and significant change in PP cohort impacted negatively on data

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance and punctuality monitored and absences logged so that patterns can be promptly identified and investigated
  • Attendance for PP children remained just about in line with the national expectation (95%)- overall attendance for PP cohort 94.6%.
  • However, 18% of PP children have an attendance figure below 90% compared to just 4% of Non - PP children.
  • Of the 21 children logged for punctuality and attendance concerns 7 are PP. So, 33% of attendance logs are for PP, which is higher than the % for Non-PP attendance concerns.
  • The majority of the PP attendance concerns and lower attendance figures are for PP children newer to school.
  • In all cases, attendance actively managed to support a positive improvement.
  • When comparing spring term 2020 PP attendance to previous terms in the last year, there is an improvement in attendance for those PP children with attendance below 90%  - showing that actions taken are positively impacting on attendance.

 

Parental Engagement and Support:

  • PP parents and carers attend events and parents evening in line with Non PP peers.
  • Staff confident and effective in use of school systems to raise and concerns and request support for children and families.
  • Support from in-school counsellor made available where appropriate.
  • Early Help intervention put into place quickly where needed.
  • Support sought through a wide range of external sources where a need identified.
  • Parents and children are supported with blended learning where appropriate.
  • During closures, parents, carers & children supported through places in school, phone calls home & resources shared. See Support during Covid19 section of webpage for full details.

 

Some planned provision was unable to take place due to Covid19 restrictions and national school closures. This has been seen to negatively impacted on the PP cohort and progress that was previously being made.

What is the impact of the expenditure on other pupils?

 

Often, all of the children in a class will reap some benefit from how the school spends its Pupil Premium. At Greasley Beauvale Primary School, we feel that children who do not receive the Pupil Premium funding still benefit from the grant in the following ways:

 

  • A focus on consistent quality first teaching positively impacts on teaching and learning for all pupils;
  • Rainbow Den (nurture provision) and in-school counselling accessed by all who will benefit;
  • Interventions that work for eligible pupils can also be implemented and used with other children, especially SEND;
  • When eligible pupils receive interventions and support (especially pre-teaching) they are more likely to understand objectives and are therefore more likely to demonstrate good learning behaviours in class and contribute to shared learning;
  • Where eligible pupils receive emotional and social support, this has a positive impact on their friendship groups and leads to happier play times for all;
  • When adults spend time working with eligible pupils in class, other children on the tables benefit.
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